No man or woman of the humblest sort can really be strong, gentle and good, without the world being better for it, without somebody being helped and comforted by the very existence of that goodness.

— Phillips Brooks (1835-1893) American Bishop
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Juicing & RAW Foods

Juicing & RAW Foods

Parsley Juice for Weight Loss

Parsley is one of the top weight loss spices available. First let’s take a look at parsley health benefits and, in particular, parsley juice health benefits as we think this is the best way to get more parsley into your diet. However, you can also use fresh parsley to garnish loads of dishes, including sandwiches or salads. Parsley juice can be drunk fresh, right after squeezing, or warm, combined with tea, under the form of an infusion.

Parsley has many, many health benefits, including reducing effects of diarrhea, improve digestion, reduces fatigue, helps with the menstrual cycle, and even provides some properties that reduce the chance of cancers, especially in the lungs. But, as the herb is a diuretic, it also has important weight loss benefits. A diuretic increases the rate of urination, which means that more matter is expelled from the body, including more calories and thus reducing weight loss. The diuretic aspect of parsley juice also means that it detoxifies the body faster than other drinks, and acts as an appetite suppressant making you feel fuller than you are.

Drinking parsley juice will also aid your digestive system, resulting in a more efficient processing system and faster metabolism. You will get more nutrients from the food you are eating, and therefore won’t have to eat as much food, resulting in weight loss. One more great health benefit provided by parsley which is especially welcomed by overweight people is that, this vegetable dissolves cholesterol within the veins. As you know a high bad cholesterol level is the negative side-effect of poor eating habits!

The parsley weight loss tip that we recommend to you is having a cup of warm parsley juice 15 minutes before you eat a main meal. You should be warned however that the effects of concentrated parsley juice are very strong, and you should therefore never have any more than one ounce of parsley in eight ounces of tea. Drinking more than the recommended amount can have a toxic result on your body.

There are loads of recipes available for parsley juice, but the most popular seem to include diluting the flavour of the parsley down with lemon or carrot. You can even include parsley in your regular main meal dishes, especially where fish is involved as you can have parsley sauce on it. You must be careful not to consume too much parsley however as it can result in some quite serious side-effects; it is a powerful herb! You should particularly not use it during pregnancy.

Nutrition facts of Parsley:

Parsley is a nutrient rich herb which contains high levels of folate, chlorophyll, calcium, beta carotene, vitamin B12, more vitamin C than citrus fruits, and also other known nutrients. Parsley roots are good source of calcium, B-complex vitamins and iron which helps to promote the glands and normalize the uptake of calcium. Parsley has pungent or slightly bitter taste with salty flavor. It is moistening, nourishing, restoring, and ‘warming’ food. It stimulates and increases the energy of organs and thus enhances the ability to digest and utilize nutrients.

Full of vitamins:

Parsley, a tiny green herb contains so many vitamins and minerals. It is rich source of vitamin a, several b vitamins and vitamin k. Also, it is a good source of vitamin C that most citrus fruits. It improves the immunity of the body which helps to prevent many infections, colds and other diseases. Vitamin C has anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant property. So, parsley is a very useful herb to prevent and ease conditions for example rheumatoid arthritis and certain cancers.

  • Folic Acid: It is one of the most important B vitamins which is essential for proper cell division and is therefore vitally essential for cancer-prevention in two areas of the body that contain rapidly dividing cells i.e. the colon, and in women, the cervix.
  • Vitamin B12: Parsley contains traces of B12 producing compounds which are required for the formation of red blood cells and normal cell growth, important for fertility, pregnancy, immunity and the prevention of degenerative illness.
  • Vitamin K: It can drastically cut risk of hip fracture and is essential for bones to get the minerals they need to form properly.
  • Vitamin C: Parsley contains three times more vitamin C than oranges which help to maintain blood cell membranes and act as an antioxidant helper.
Minerals:

Parsley is rich in minerals like iron, calcium, potassium, copper, magnesium, manganese, sulphur and iodine.

  • Fluorine: An important nutritional component, fluorine is abundantly found in parsley. It protects the body from infectious invasion, germs and viruses.
  • Iron: A half-cup of fresh parsley or one tablespoon dried contains about 10 percent of your iron daily requirements.
Other important nutrients:
  • Chlorophyll: Parsley is rich in chlorophyll which inhibits the spread of bacteria, fungi and other organisms. It has slight anti-bacterial and anti-fungal property and so helps to boost immune response and to relieve mucus congestion, sinusitis and other ‘damp’ conditions. It also helps the lungs to release residues from environmental pollution.
  • Beta carotene: In the body, it is converted to vitamin A which helps to build strong immune system. It also benefits the liver and protects the lungs and colon.
  • Essential Fatty Acids: An important essential fatty acid, alpha-linolenic acid is also obtained from parsley.

Easy Parsley Juice Recipe

Ingredients: a handful of parsley, some carrots, cucumbers, some celery and a lemon.

Method: Peel the lemon and add all ingredients in a mixer. Blend and serve one glass of the beverage together with a few cups of ice.

How to Make Parsley Juice?

  • It is very easy to prepare parsley juice and only thing you require is a juicer. Parsley has a strong taste so it is very important to add other veggies with it. Use milder vegetables with it.
  • Limit the consumption of parsley juice to about one cup a day as it is toxic in nature. Use only 1 ounce to a glass of another liquid if you want to take it straight.
  • The easiest and most nutritious parsley juice recipe includes one handful of parsley, a couple stalks of celery, a few cukes, carrots, and a peeled lemon. Combine it all together in the mixer and serve over ice.

Health benefits of Parsley juice:

Diuretic & Laxative:

Parsley is beneficial to the kidneys as it has diuretic property. Additionally, its laxative efficacy helps the body to eliminate toxins from the body. People who are on diuretic medication should be cautious while taking parsley juice to the diet as it has additional diuretic effect.

Breathe Freshener:

Parsley acts as natural breath freshener so drinking its juice after consuming strong-smelling foods, for example garlic or onions, will clear the heavy odor from the breath. For freshening of your breath, try nibbling it at the end of the meal.

Anemia Treatment:

As parsley is a good source of iron, it is also used in treatment of anemia. Anemic people who have difficulty in taking iron supplements may want to consider drinking parsley juice in its place. For specific dosages, consult your health care provider.

Immune Booster:

Parsley acts an extraordinary immunity enhancing food as it is high in vitamin C, beta carotene, B12, chlorophyll and essential fatty acid. It is one of the most important herbs to supply vitamins to the body. Its nutrients help to build up of strong immune system. You can also add a handful of fresh parsley to the vegetables for juicing purpose as it will raise the benefit to the immune system.

Digestion:

Parsley has excellent digestive property. It enhances the digestion of proteins and fats so promotes intestinal absorption, liver assimilation and storage. The digestive activity of parsley is due to its high enzyme content.

Hormonal support:

Parsley enhances estrogen and nourishes and restores the blood of the uterus in women. Delayed menstruation, PMS, and the menopause like conditions can often improved with parsley.

Insect Bite Treatment:

Massage the parsley or parsley juice directly onto the insect bites for relief. It helps to decrease the swelling and itch of insect bites.

Other health benefits of parsley:

  • •It maintains elasticity of blood vessels, and helps to repair bruises.
    •Apply scrubbed parsley onto their scalps to cure baldness.
    •It acts as blood purifier.
    •It dissolves cholesterol within the veins.
    •Diarrhea is greatly helped by drinking parsley juice.
    •Parsley is a good source of iron and so it helps to repair and provides components for better blood cells.
    •It relieves edema and acts as blood vessel strengthener.
    •Treats deafness and ear infections
    •It helps to dissolve gallstones.
    •It inhibits tumor formation, particularly in the lungs.
    •It enriches the liver and nourishes the blood. Parsley helps to decrease liver congestion, clearing toxins and aiding rejuvenation.
    •Parsley juice contains apiol, a constituent of the female sex hormone estrogen which helps to make the cycles regular.
    •Parsley juice has weight loss benefits from being a diuretic.
    •It is effective for nearly all kidney and urinary complaints as it enhances kidney activity and can help to eliminate wastes from the blood and tissues of the kidneys.
    •It helps to improve edema and general water retention, fatigue and scanty or painful urination.
    •Women and cardiac patients can benefit from parsley’s actions as it carries unwanted and unnecessary fluids out of the body.

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Herbal Wisdom for nutrition

Herbal Wisdom for nutrition

VITAMINS

VITAMIN A Enhances immunity, prevents eye problems and skin disorders. Important in bone and teeth formation. Protects against colds and infection. Slows aging process.HERBAL SOURCES: Alfalfa, borage leaves, burdock root, cayenne, chickweed, eyebright, fennel seed, hops, horsetail, kelp, lemongrass, mullein, nettle, oat straw, paprika, parsley, peppermint, plantain, raspberry leaves, red clover, rose hips, sage, uva ursi, violet leaves, watercress, yellow dock.

VITAMIN B1 (Thiamine) Promotes growth, improves mental attitude, aids digestion, helps strengthen nervous system and prevent stress. HERBAL SOURCES: Alfalfa, bladder wrack, burdock root, catnip, cayenne, chamomile, chickweed, eyebright, fennel seed, fenugreek, hops, nettle, oat straw, parsley, peppermint, raspberry leaves, red clover, rose hips, sage, yarrow, and yellow dock.

VITAMIN B2 (Riboflavin) Needed for red blood cell formation, aids growth and reproduction, promotes hair, skin and nail growth. Important in the prevention and treatment of cataracts. HERBAL SOURCES: Alfalfa, bladder wrack, burdock root, catnip, cayenne, chamomile, chickweed, eyebright, fennel seed, fenugreek, ginseng, hops, horsetail, mullein, nettle, oat straw, parsley, peppermint, raspberry leaves, red clover, rose hips, sage, yellow dock.

VITAMIN B3(Niacin) Essential for proper circulation and healthy skin. Increases energy, aids digestion, helps prevent migraines. HERBAL SOURCES: Alfalfa, burdock root, catnip, cayenne, chamomile, chickweed, eyebright, fennel seed, hops, licorice, mullein, nettle, oat straw, parsley, peppermint, raspberry leaf, red clover, rose hips, slippery elm, yellow dock.

VITAMIN B5 (Panothenic Acid) Enhances stamina, prevents anemia, helps wounds heal, fights infection, strengthens immune system. HERBAL SOURCES: Alfalfa, burdock root, nettle, yellow dock.

VITAMIN B6 (Pyridoxine) Needed to produce hydrochloric acid. Aids in absorption of fats, and protein. Mildly diuretic, helps prevent kidney stones. Helpful in treating allergies, arthritis, and asthma. HERBAL SOURCES: Alfalfa, catnip, oat straw.

VITAMIN B12 (cyanocobalamin) Helps prevent anemia. Protects nervous system, improves concentration, aids digestion. HERBAL SOURCES: Alfalfa, bladder wrack, hops.

VITAMIN C (ascorbic acid) Helps calcium and iron formation. Enhances immunity. Helps prevent cancer. Aids in production of anti-stress hormones. Antioxidant required for proper tissue growth and repair, and adrenal gland function. HERBAL SOURCES: Alfalfa, burdock root, cayenne, chickweed, eyebright, fennel seed, fenugreek, hops, horsetail, kelp, peppermint, mullein, nettle, oat straw, paprika, parsley, pine needle, plantain, raspberry leaf, red clover, rose hips, skullcap, violet leaves, yarrow, yellow dock.

VITAMIN D Essential for calcium and phosphorous utilization. Prevents rickets. Needed for normal growth of bones and teeth. Helps regulate heartbeat. Prevents cancer and enhances immunity. Aids thyroid function and blood clotting. HERBAL SOURCES: Alfalfa, horsetail, nettle, parsley.

VITAMIN E Antioxidant which helps prevent cancer and heart disease. Prevents cell damage. Reduces blood pressure and promotes healthy skin and hair. HERBAL SOURCES: Alfalfa, bladder wrack, dandelion, dong quai, flaxseed, nettle, oat straw, raspberry leaf, rose hips.

VITAMIN K Promotes healthy liver function. Helps bone formation and repair. Increases longevity.

HERBAL SOURCES: Alfalfa, green tea, kelp, nettle, oat straw, shepherds purse.

MINERALS

CALCIUM Builds and protects bones and teeth. Helps maintain regular heartbeat. Prevents muscle cramping.HERBAL SOURCES: Alfalfa, burdock root, cayenne, chamomile, chickweed, chicory, dandelion, eyebright, fennel seed, fenugreek, flaxseed, hops, horsetail, kelp, lemongrass, mullein, nettle, oat straw, paprika, parsley, peppermint, plantain, raspberry leaf, red clover, rose hips, shepherd’s purse, violet leaves, yarrow, yellow dock.

CHROMIUM Vital in the synthesis of glucose and the metabolism of cholesterol, fats and proteins. Maintains blood pressure and blood sugar levels. HERBAL SOURCES:Catnip, horsetail, licorice, nettle, oat straw, red clover, sarsaparilla, wild yam, yarrow.

COPPER Converts iron to hemoglobin. Protects against anemia. Needed for healthy bones and joints. HERBAL SOURCES: Sheep sorrel.

GERMANIUM Helps fight pain, detoxify the body, and keep immune system functioning properly. HERBAL SOURCES: Aloe vera, comfrey, ginseng, suma.

IODINE Needed in trace amounts for a healthy thyroid gland , and to help metabolize excess fat. HERBAL SOURCES: alendula, tarragon leaves, turkey rhubarb.

IRON Essential for metabolism, and the production of hemoglobin. HERBAL SOURCES: Alfalfa, burdock root, catnip, cayenne, chamomile, chickweed, chicory, dandelion, dong quai, eyebright, fennel seed, fenugreek, horsetail, kelp, lemongrass, licorice, milk thistle seed, mullein, nettle, oatstraw, paprika, parsley, peppermint, plantain, raspberry leaf, rose hips, sarsaparilla, shepherd’s purse, uva ursi, yellow dock.

MAGNESIUM Prevents calcification of soft tissue. Helps reduce and dissolve calcium phosphate kidney stones. Helps prevent birth defects. Improves cardiovascular system.HERBAL SOURCES: Alfalfa, bladder wrack, catnip, cayenne, chamomile, chickweed, dandelion, eyebright, fennel, fenugreek, hops, horsetail, lemongrass, licorice, mullein, nettle, oat straw, paprika, parsley, peppermint, raspberry leaf, red clover, sage, shepherd’s purse, yarrow, yellow dock.
 Dried herbs are packed with vitamins and a healthy addition to almost any meal. Dried Coriander provides the most magnesium with 694mg (174% DV) per 100 gram serving, or 14mg (3% DV) per tablespoon. It is followed by Chives (160% DV), Spearmint (151% DV), Dill (112% DV), Sage (107% DV), Basil (106% DV), and Savory (95% DV).

MANGANESE Minute quantities of this mineral are needed for healthy nerves, blood sugar regulation, normal bone growth, and thyroid hormone production. HERBAL SOURCES: Alfalfa, burdock root, catnip, chamomile, chickweed, dandelion, eyebright, fennel seed, fenugreek, ginseng, hops, horsetail, lemongrass, mullein, parsley, peppermint, raspberry leaf, red clover, rose hip, wild yam, yarrow, yellow dock. #2: Dried Herbs

MOLYBDENUM Small amounts of this mineral are required for nitrogen metabolism. Supports bone growth, and strengthens teeth. HERBAL SOURCES: Red clover blossoms.

PHOSPHOROUS Needed for teeth and bone formation, nerve impulse transfer, normal heart rhythm, and kidney function.HERBAL SOURCES: Burdock root, turkey rhubarb, slippery elm bark.

POTASSIUM Regulates water balance, and muscle function. Important for health nervous system and regular heart rhythm. HERBAL SOURCES: Catnip, hops, horsetail, nettle, plantain, red clover, sage, skullcap.

SELENIUM Provides an important trace element for prostrate gland in males. Protects immune system and helps regulate thyroid hormones. HERBAL SOURCES:Alfalfa, burdock root, catnip, cayenne, chamomile, chickweed, fennel seed, ginseng, garlic, hawthorn berry, hops, horsetail, lemongrass, milk thistle nettle, oat straw, parsley, peppermint, raspberry leaf, rose hips, sarsaparilla, uva ursi, yarrow, yellow dock.

SULFUR This mineral helps skin and hair. Fights bacterial infection. Aids liver function. Disinfects blood. Protects against toxic substances. HERBAL SOURCES: Horsetail.

VANADIUM Needed for cellular metabolism and formation of bones and teeth. Improves insulin utilization. HERBAL SOURCES: Dill.

ZINC Promotes growth and mental alertness. Accelerates healing. Regulates oil glands. Promotes healthy immune system, and healing of wounds. HERBAL SOURCES: Alfalfa, burdock root, cayenne, chamomile, chickweed, dandelion, eyebright, fennel seed, hops, milk thistle, mullein, nettle, parsley, rose hips, sage, sarsaparilla, skullcap, wild yam.

Nourishing Daily Brews

Daily infusions of nourishing herbs (you learn how to make these in the Herbal Medicine Making Kit) such as nettle, raspberry leaf, oatstraw, and lemon balm are a wonderful way to add extra nutrients to your diet. Children and toddlers can benefit from them as a healthy alternative to sugary juice drinks. Herbs that help tame stress and anxiety can also play a huge part in keeping our systems in balance. A convenient way to prepare your daily brews is to make them in the evening and let them steep overnight. In the morning you can strain out the plant material and refrigerate your infusion if desired, or carry it with you to drink throughout the day.

 

Just Say No to Synthetic Vitamins and Processed Foods!

by Cori Young,

For some time now there has been a sort of gross reductionism going on in the field of health and nutrition. Part of it is due to the type of research being done, and the way that it is interpreted

to serve the corporations sponsoring it. Specific nutrients that are shown to be beneficial in clinical studies are isolated, often in synthetic form, and heralded as new weapon against cancer, heart disease, old age, etc.

There are some rather disturbing marketing trends going on right now that are geared towards women and children. Television and print advertisements show smiling, athletic women racing from one place to the next while nibbling on a “just for women” candy bar that has been “fortified with a bunch of synthetic vitamins and minerals as well as a whole host of other artificial additives and preservatives.

Children have ‘fortified juices, cereals, cereal bars, and even fluoridated ‘nursery water’.

What these ad campaigns don’t show is no matter how fancy these products are dressed up and displayed, they are still dead, processed foods that may contain harmful ingredients like hydrogenated oils, preservatives, and neurotoxins.

Even in the field of “alternative health” we find this same sort of reductionism going on. Herbal compounds are isolated, extracted and ingested in inappropriate quantities, without the synergy that the whole plant provides.

We’ve all heard the alarming research showing that a specific herb has been found to be toxic – comfrey, ephedra, kava, etc. Yet somehow Native peoples managed to use these herbs very successfully for many generations. Many of us still do. There is something to be said for using plants and foods in their whole forms and for cultivating a relationship with the different energies offered by the plants around us.

It’s very hard to improve on a diet of wild foods and herbs. Well-nourished bodies and minds enjoy balnaced hormones and hearty immune systems.

Many of us commonly turn to herbs in times of imbalance – but the use of herbs can also be a wonderful preventative ally. Daily infusions of nourishing herbs such as nettle, raspberry leaf, oatstraw, and lemon balm are a wonderful way to add extra nutrients to your diet.

I say we trade in the food labels showing the isolated synthetic ingredients provided in the de-natured, processed products for a diet rich in wild foods and nourishing herbs.

Unlike synthetic pills, daily herbal infusions provide essential nutrients in a highly assimilable form.

Vitamins & minerals are abundant in many common herbs:

 


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Seed Swap – Cherryville

March 10th At the Cherryville Hall was an amazing success, over 160 signatures in the guest book and many vendors who taught and shared garden wisdom.

Bee SAFE celebrated it landslide results for the over whelming votes for a GMO free region. Thanks to their efforts and organization they demonstrated the power of cohesiveness as a community. A special thanks to

Special thanks to Vendors and Educators

 

 

Bee SAFE at Enderby Seed Swap

Cherryville: 96.4% in favour of banning GM crops!

Following the presentation given by Bee SAFE in February, Cherryville overwhelmingly supported a ban on GMO crops. “It’s scary to see that had we not called for a vote, 3.6% of Cherryville voters would have decided on our future – if the GMO trend had continued, it would have been impossible for anyone else to grow organic or conventional crops” said Carla Vierke.

The fact that GMO crops contaminate other crops means that it’s impossible for GMO to co-exist. GMO corn can contaminate organic corn from as far as 3 km while GMO canola can contaminate all brassica including cabbage, kale, broccoli, wild mustard, etc…

United Nations calls for fundamental shift in farming.

The United Nations recently reported that ecological farming could double food production in 10 years, and that a “fundamental shift in farming” away from GMO and industrial farming is needed. Jane Emlyn adds  “the solution now is to support small-scale farms, developing a resilient food economy based on health, quality of life, protection of the environment and the elimination of pesticides.”

Rural Lumby to talk GMO!

Bee SAFE will hold a meeting to discuss banning GMO crops on Wednesday March 27th at 7 PM at the Whitevalley Community Centre. Please come and let everyone know so we can make an informed decision on whether to join Cherryville and protect our farms and our food.

Bee SAFE has asked RDNO’s Agricultural Advisory Committee to develop a “Transition Guide” for GMO farmers so they can get all the help and advice needed to transition to an agriculture that doesn’t take away others’ right to grow non GMO crops.

How to keep away from Monsanto seeds!

It is that time again for the seed catalogs to arrive and for people to go to seed swaps.  It may surprise you that seeds that you have been purchasing for years may be owned by Monsanto who has been buying up seed companies at an alarming rate.  Approximately 40% of the US vegetable seed market is owned by Monsanto when they purchased Seminis. See the Heirloom seeds marketed by Monsanto and the reasons they benefit from them.

Planting a garden means more than choosing certified organic seeds because Monsanto has positioned itself to make money off the increase in home gardens.  This means that when you buy organic or heirloom seeds from a completely independent company you may be supporting the big nasty corporations.

Here’s how to buy Organic or Heirloom Seeds Without Supporting Monsanto:
Don’t buy from these.
DO buy from these companies who are not affiliated with Monsanto or Seminis.
Avoid certain heirloom varieties because Monsanto now apparently owns the name
Ask seed companies if they have taken the Safe Seed Pledge. These companies have done so:

It would seem that Monsanto is trying to make money on each and every one of us.  They are not satisfied that they have monopolized the supermarkets by making most of the foods contaminated with GMO but now they are going after the organic home gardener.  Here is somebackground information that you may find interesting. Let’s all do our part to educate ourselves and stop Monsanto from choking out our ability to grow healthy food.

Weekend Events:

A marvelous FREE documentary film festival in Kelowna this weekend at the Okanagan College and at the UBC campus going from Thursday evening, March 7 to Sunday, March 10. See the Schedule here.

Among the many excellent films, you may not want to miss BITTER SEEDSSaturday 11:30 AM: since the World Trade Organization forced India to open its markets to GM seeds such as Monsanto’s BT Cotton, farmers have been forced into untenable debt in order to buy the more expensive seeds, fertilizers and pesticides required to make them grow.  Every 30 minutes a farmer in India kills himself…

Cherryville Seed Swap: 
Sunday at the Cherryville hall from 10 AM to 3 PM – don’t forget time will have changed!

Monsanto ‘Owned’ Heirloom Seednames

First of all, Monsanto or nobody else can actually OWN these varieties of seed, but as developers of some of these varieties and as suppliers of them under many different companies it can be hard to tell who owns what.  It does not stand to reason that any crop of these varieties growing today or anytime in the future will be genetically modified in any way.  Some of these varieties can be found without any continuing connection to Monsanto or Seminis but it is important to be a little more cautious with these.

If you are the type of gardener who purchases vegetable seeds or seedlings, including tomato plants from a local garden center, be mindful the varieties you choose. Conversely, you might be placing money into the hands of Monsanto Corporation. Below is the list of Seminis/Monsanto home-garden vegetable variations.  It’s often best to buy directly from seed farmers and companies that you can trust (you can find many of them here)

Print this list, and keep a copy in your wallet. Don’t be caught off guard the next time you impulse shop at a big-box garden center.

The seed varieties you have obtained as “heirlooms” from heirloom or organic seed companies are “NOT” GMO seeds, even though they are officially “owned” by Monsanto. As far as we know, the only GMO vegetable seeds available for sale today are new hybrid varieties of zucchini and summer squash, so be sure you order these from certified organic suppliers.

Please understand that Monsanto only owns the trademark names for these “heirloom” varieties. This stretegic move holds two advantages for Monsanto:

1.) prevents new companies from naming new varieties with these or very similar names.

2.) it is an effort to stop lucrative sales by these other companies trying to leverage the heirloom name and consumer loyalty for those heirloom varieties.

If you have left over seeds, do not be reluctant to plant them. Monsanto will only profit from customers purchasing these varieties from companies that are stocking seeds obtained directly from Monsanto or one of its distributors.

Beans: Aliconte, Brio, Bronco, Cadillac, Ebro, Etna, Eureka, Festina, Gina, Goldmine, Goldenchild, Labrador, Lynx, Magnum, Matador, Spartacus, Storm, Strike, Stringless Blue Lake 7, Tapia, Tema

Broccoli: Coronado Crown, Major, Packman

Cabbage: Atlantis, Golden Acre, Headstart, Platinum Dynasty, Red Dynasty

Carrot: Bilbo, Envy, Forto, Juliana, Karina, Koroda PS, Royal Chantenay, Sweetness III

Cauliflower: Cheddar, Minuteman

Cucumber: Babylon, Cool Breeze Imp., Dasher II, Emporator, Eureka, Fanfare HG, Marketmore 76, Mathilde, Moctezuma, Orient Express II, Peal, Poinsett 76, Salad Bush, Sweet Slice, Sweet Success PS, Talladega

Eggplant: Black Beauty, Fairytale, Gretel, Hansel, Lavender Touch, Twinkle, White Lightening

Hot Pepper: Anaheim TMR 23, Ancho Saint Martin, Big Bomb, Big Chile brand of Sahuaro, Caribbean Red, Cayenne Large Red Thick, Chichen Itza, Chichimeca, Corcel, Garden Salsa SG, Habanero, Holy Mole brand of Salvatierro, Hungarian Yellow Wax Hot, Ixtapa X3R, Lapid, Mariachi brand of Rio de Oro, Mesilla, Milta, Mucho Nacho brand of Grande, Nainari, Serrano del Sol brand of Tuxtlas, Super Chile, Tam Vera Cruz

Lettuce: Braveheart, Conquistador

Melon: Early Dew, Sante Fe, Saturno

Onion: Candy, Cannonball, Century, Red Zeppelin, Savannah Sweet, Sierra Blanca, Sterling, Vision

Pumpkin: Applachian, Harvest Moon, Jamboree HG, Orange Smoothie, Phantom, Prize Winner, Rumbo, Snackface, Spirit, Spooktacular, Trickster

Spinach: Hellcat

Squash: Ambassador, Canesi, Clarita, Commander, Dixie, Early Butternut, Gold Rush, Grey Zucchini, Greyzini, Lolita, Papaya Pear, Peter Pan, Portofino, President, Richgreen Hybrid Zucchini, Storr’s Green, Sungreen, Sunny Delight, Taybelle PM

Sweet Corn: Devotion, Fantasia, Merit, Obession, Passion, Temptation

Sweet Pepper: Baron, Bell Boy, Big Bertha PS, Biscayne, Blushing Beauty, Bounty, California Wonder 300, Camelot, Capistrano, Cherry Pick, Chocolate Beauty, Corno Verde, Cubanelle W, Dumpling brand of Pritavit, Early Sunsation, Flexum, Fooled You brand of Dulce, Giant Marconi, Gypsy, Jumper, Key West, King Arthur, North Star, Orange Blaze, Pimiento Elite, Red Knight, Satsuma, Socrates, Super Heavyweight, Sweet Spot

Tomato: Amsterdam, Beefmaster, Betterboy, Big Beef, Burpee’s Big Boy, Caramba, Celebrity, Cupid, Early Girl, Granny Smith, Health Kick, Husky Cherry Red, Jetsetter brand of Jack, Lemon Boy, Margharita, Margo, Marmande VF PS, Marmara, Patio, Phoenix, Poseidon 43, Roma VF, Royesta, Sun Sugar, Super Marzano, Sweet Baby Girl, Tiffany, Tye-Dye, Viva Italia, Yaqui

Watermelon: Apollo, Charleston Grey, Crimson Glory, Crimson Sweet, Eureka, Jade Star, Mickylee, Olympia

About Fritz Kreiss

Fritz Kreiss is the founding head of Occupy Monsanto. He has a history in natural health, nutrition, herbal medicine, Eastern Medicine, acupuncture, kinesiology, physiology, and many years of practice as a professional massage therapist and teacher.

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Therapeutic Baths

Charcoal – Detox

 

The charcoal bath can be used for smokers and alcoholics who need detoxification as well as anyone who needs to detox.
Charcoal baths are also effective for people with skin disorders such as eczema, skin irritations, atopic dermatitis, infection, and inflammations. Activated charcoal’s purifying, detoxifying, deodorizing, and anti-bacterial properties will wash any impurities on the skin.
Charcoal baths will remove impurities, relieve fatigue, and recharge you!

Procedure

Put about 6 cups (2 lbs.) of granular charcoal in a cloth bag, tie it, and place it in the tub.
Fill the tub and soak yourself.
After the first use, dry the bag. When using a second and third time, add a cup of granular charcoal to the cloth bag. Discard after the third use.
Placing charcoal first before filling the tub with water will help the body to get warm faster, keep the water warmer and cleaner, and make the skin smoother.
This remedy can be found at actcharcoal.com.

Ginger Bath: Sweat Those Toxins Out!

GingerBefore diving into the ginger bath, let me share with you some information about ginger, a powerful health-enhancing root.Ginger is a tropical species originating in South East Asia, but the exact origin of this rhizome is uncertain. As Ginger is not known to grow in the wild, the plant would have rapidly spread from the Indian Ocean to Africa and the West Indies, where it is most widely cultivated today.

Pythagoras the ancient Greek mathematician and philosopher was one of its staunch supporters, and the Romans -who valued its medicinal properties and popularized its use throughout their European colonies- brought Ginger to Europe. King Henri the 8th of England is said to have used ginger for protection against the plague.

For centuries, Arab merchants controlled the ginger trade as well as other exotic spices that were highly sought after by the Europeans for culinary and medicinal use.

Ginger is also mentioned in the literature of the ancient Greeks and Romans. It has found its way into the most classic of ancient remedies, the “Mithridate”, a mythical poison antidote, which was one of the most highly sought-after drugs during the Renaissance.

Ginger Bath

What prompted me to write this article is the incredible experience I personally had with the ginger bath.

I had been feeling cranky for a few days with flu symptoms I was unable to shake off. The fact that I was overwhelmed with work and in a deadly race against deadlines only made matters worse.

Feeling sorry for my misery, my friend Francine insisted I try a ginger bath, without going into much detail as to what happens in the process.

I obediently obliged and, in the evening, feeling shaky and achy, filled my bathtub with hot water and half a cup of grated ginger, as suggested. I gratefully eased myself into the warm and fragrant water.

Little did I expect what was going to happen next!

Within 5 minutes of lying in the bathtub, it felt like my body had turned into a tap! Sweat started pouring down my face and out of every single pore in my body in a way I had never experienced, not even while doing the most strenuous of sports! Not only during my 20-minute bath, but for the next couple of hours, completely soaking the bathrobe I was wearing.

I slept like a baby that night and, to my amazement, woke up feeling energetic, cleansed and … completely symptom-free!

Is it magic?

Not at all! We all know by now that sweating is one of the most potent ways to get rid of toxins.

So, for those of us who don’t have access to a sauna or steam bath, the ginger bath is a simple and sure way to sweat all those nasty toxins out of your body!

Ginger Recipes

GingerGinger Bath: You can use either fresh grated ginger or ginger powder. Add ½ a cup of freshly grated ginger or a rounded teaspoon of ginger powder in hot or warm water and soak for 15-20 minutes. Please remember that the ginger bath will make you sweat profusely for at least an hour afterwards, so wear a bathrobe or sweat clothes.

Make sure you drink plenty of water after the bath. If you have sensitive skin or are allergy-prone, test ginger on your skin for irritation before the bath.

Ginger Infusion Recipe: The ginger infusion works wonderfully in treating common cold and flu symptoms. Its effective anti-mucus properties relieve chest and nasal congestion, as well as inflammations. Finely chop a good piece of ginger (slightly smaller than your palm). This infusion will keep for up to 48 hours. Place in 1 litre of water and bring to the boil. Once boiling, reduce the heat and leave to simmer for 10 to 15 minutes, then let it steep for 10 minutes. Serve a ¾ mug of ginger and add ½ a squeezed lemon and 1 teaspoonful of honey, or to taste. Drink throughout the day as soon as you have cold or flu symptoms. This infusion will get rid of them in 48 hours!

Note: The longer the ginger soaks in the water, the sharper the taste becomes.

Ginger and Garlic Paste Recipe: Peel and chop 4 ounces of garlic and 4 ounces of fresh ginger root; mix ingredients in a blender; transfer to a jar and add one teaspoon of olive oil; refrigerate. Use a spoonful of this delicious blend as a base for flavouring your recipes.

Main Health-Enhancing Benefits of Ginger

  • Calms nausea, including motion sickness dizziness
  • Relieves gas and bloating
  • Helps stop diarrhea
  • Boosts digestion
  • Calms menstrual cramps
  • Relieves headaches
  • Anti-inflamatory
  • Stabilises blood pressure (equally when too high or too low)
  • Lowers cholesterol
  • Soothes cold and flu symptoms, as well as respiratory infections
  • Known for its anti-cancer properties
  • Freshens the breath naturally

The anti-inflammatory properties of ginger have been known and valued for centuries. Modern Medicine has now provided scientific support for the long-held belief that ginger contains constituents with anti-inflammatory properties. It is known to reduce the pain of rheumatoid arthritis and encourage blood circulation.

Caution: If you take anti-coagulants, consult your doctor before using ginger.

If you’re looking to lose weight, then the Detox Bath is an ideal addition to your routine. A combination of the Detox Bath with the occasional ginger bath is all you need to maintain a naturally healthy, fit and symptom and toxin-free body.

By Rand Khalil & Lina Baker

Oatmeal baths are both relaxing and soothing, especially when your skin feels itchy (such as during a bout of chicken pox or poison ivy rash),[1] or when it is inflamed (for example, as a result of allergies, insect bites, or sunburn).[2] Oatmeal is excellent for your skin, smells good, and leaves your skin feeling soft. With an oatmeal bath, you might wish you could just sit there forever. As an added advantage, there are limitless variations on the traditional oatmeal bath, some of which are described here. Follow these steps to prepare an easy but effective oatmeal bath to soothe your skin in the comfort of your own home.

 

Ingredients

  • Plain, unflavored, (preferably whole-grain) oatmeal; finer oatmeal is best
  • Small lavender buds (about 1/4 to 1/2 cup) (optional)
  • Lavender (or other) essential oils (optional), for a relaxing bath, check for all usage precautions
  • 1/2 to 1 cup of buttermilk or regular milk, for a relaxing, softening bath (optional)
  • Epsom salts, for a rejuvenating bath (optional)

Steps

  1. Pour about 1/3 to 3/4 cup of oatmeal into a measuring cup. The amount used will depend on how large your coffee filter or muslin piece is.

  2. Pour the oatmeal from the cup into a bowl.

  3. Push down on the dry oatmeal with the back of a spoon. This is to get rid of any clumps that might have formed in storage.

    • You can skip this step if your oatmeal is already in smallish pieces.
    • If the oatmeal pieces are really large, place them into a plastic bag and turn them into smaller pieces by running a rolling pin over the bag and mashing them.
    Add extras to the oatmeal, if wished. If you are having the bath for relaxation purposes, feel free to add additional elements. If you are using the oatmeal bath to treat itchiness, rashes, inflamed or sore skin, however, it is probably advisable to either avoid this step or to be very cautious, as these additions could aggravate the condition. Additions to consider include:Add 
    • Lavender buds. If you don’t have lavender buds, take a stalk of dried lavender and break the individual buds off the branch and into the bowl.
    • Add a few drops of your preferred essential oil to the bowl. Be sure to choose a safe essential oil for bath use. Although this step is optional, it does heighten the enjoyment of the bathing experience. If you are suffering from a skin condition, skip this step.
    • Mix all additions in well with the spoon until the contents are evenly distributed.
  4. Spoon the mixture into the coffee filter bag or muslin piece. The filter bags used in the images for this tutorial were size 4 filters (suitable for 8-12 cups of coffee), and required four level soup spoons of mixture to fill.

    • Tie it off with a rubber band, string, or ribbon. A rubber band is probably the easiest to use unless you have a friend to hold the bag for you while you tie it with string or ribbon.
  5. Fill the tub with relatively hot water. If adding milk as well, pour the buttermilk or regular milk into the tub under the running water from the faucet.

    • Another optional step – add about 3/4 cup of Epsom salts to the buttermilk when you pour it into the tub to ease sore muscles and help achieve softer skin. Skip this step if you are treating your skin for any itchiness or soreness.
  6. Throw the oatmeal/lavender bag in the back of the tub, away from the bath end with the running water. Allow to cool. As the tub cools to a tolerable temperature, the heat will cause the essences of oatmeal and lavender to disperse.

  7. Step into the tub when it is tepid. Once in the bath, you cangently squeeze the oatmeal sachet to release more of the oatmeal liquid through the bath; don’t squeeze too hard if you’re using the filter paper version though, or it will break, leaving oatmeal in your bathtub. Enjoy the bath for as long as wished, although if you are treating a skin condition, don’t stay longer than 10 minutes to avoid aggravating your skin condition.

    • Light some pleasant vanilla or lavender candles for an even more relaxing setting.
    • If you have a skin condition, dry with care, using gentle blotting actions with a soft towel over the itchy or sore parts of your skin.
    • Repeat as needed. The beauty of oatmeal baths is that they are gentle enough to be enjoyed daily if wished.

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Sounds Therapy

“Sound will one day heal disease.” stated in early 80’s by Sharron Mattson

www.crystaljourney.ca/  Experience sound from David Hickey

One of the most astoundingly powerful treatments recently “discovered” by mainstream medicine is sound therapy — and one of the oldest forms of sound therapy comes from the ancient practice of Qigong (pronounced chee gong or chee kung).

Qigong is a self-healing therapy that combines sound, vibration, movement, breathing, and visualization to heal disease and injury by improving the flow of the vital energy or life force called qi (pronounced chee).

“Qigong is the most profound health practice ever invented by mankind for preventing illness…reducing stress…managing chronic conditions…increasing longevity…and promoting healthy, active aging,” says Tom Rogers, president of the Qigong Institute.

Mind-body practices such as Qigong therapy improve the health of the immune system, nervous system, and internal organs. Just as important—or even more—is how Qigong melts away stress, the root cause of the vast majority of all disease.

The many forms of Qigong therapy (or external Qi healing, as it’s sometimes referred to in the U.S.), has been extensively researched, especially in China, with increasing scientific attention in the West.
Currently, Qigong therapy is even used as a treatment option for cancer at many integrative facilities, and has demonstrated benefits for myriad other common and serious ailments.

Read more: http://undergroundhealthreporter.com/qigong-therapy-sound-healing#ixzz2KD4kXOrT

The 8 Powerful Healing Sounds of Qigong Therapy

 

Here are the general effects of each of the 8 healing sounds as practiced standing still:

 

Ah is a smooth, steady sound that benefits the lungs and relieves respiratory illnesses (asthma, bronchitis, colds, etc.).

Hh is a silent sound, a quiet exhalation good for the heart and circulation, heart palpitations, chest discomfort, shortness of breath, heartburn, and irritability.

 Heng is a quick, sharp sound that clears up the kidneys, lower back pain, prostate illness, some reproductive conditions, and ringing in the ears.

Hu is a deep, droning sound beneficial for the stomach, excessive or suppressed appetite, and abdominal gas.

 

Mer is a low, drawn out sound (moo-r) that affects the spleen, thereby alleviating digestive problems.

 

Xu is a quiet, protracted sound (shh) that’s great for the liver, lower back, some intestinal issues, erectile dysfunction, and urinary difficulties.

 

Yi is extended sound (pronounced like the long e, as in easy) that controls the flow of qi in the human body. It can be especially useful for headaches and back soreness.

 

Hong is a lingering, sonorous sound that stimulates the lymph system and facilitates the    elimination of waste from the body.

Each person will vocalize the sounds in his or her own unique way, depending on factors such as:

      • Breath

 

      • Lung capacity

 

      • Visualization

 

      • Enthusiasm

 

      • Vocal cords

 

      • Intention

 

      • Energy level

 

      • Concentration

 

                   • Emotional state

Especially because individuals naturally vary the sounds to meet their own needs, the 8 sounds are 100% safe and effective for everyone. “Even when vocalizing the same syllable,” Wood writes, “Ah for example, my Ah is going to be different from your Ah.”

The important thing to remember is that whatever sound you vocalize is the right sound for you in that moment—just as long as you’re practicing proper breathing techniques and intentionality (see more about breathing and intention below).

“Trust that your body is going to automatically do what is beneficial for your health,” Wood advises. The sounds can be practiced standing still…walking…seated…and lying down. Benefits vary slightly between the positions.

How to Practice the 8 Sounds

Experts say it’s best to start with practicing the 8 sounds while seated. “Settle into a comfortable position and let your mind become quiet,” Wood recommends. Start by focusing on your breath, and then “for each of the sounds, breathe into your belly [and] as you exhale, make the sound.”

If you’re practicing the sounds properly, you should be able to feel the sound vibrate throughout your entire body.

As you make the sound, says Wood, “visualize the organ or body area you wish to improve as completely healthy and functional.” This is the intention behind the practice. Without the proper intention, the sound is meaningless.

Ideally, you should repeat each sound several times so that the entire practice takes between 15 and 20 minutes. Wood recommends doing 12, 16, or even 24 repetitions of each of the sounds. “The more you do,” Wood says, “up to repetitions of 50 of each sound, the more you will benefit!”

Read more: http://undergroundhealthreporter.com/qigong-therapy-sound-healing#ixzz2KD38cgAp


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Healing Clays

Clay baths have been used for centuries as a safe and effective method of natural detoxification. Today, clay baths are a common treatment for everything from heavy metal poisoning, radiation and pesticide exposure, and soothing aching muscles. There’s even some solid, encouraging results reported by scientists who treat autism with clay baths.

more info. coming soon


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